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Extracts from Made of the Write Stuff by Paul Rance

Why Self Discipline Matters to Writers


One thing a writer learns, even unintentionally, is self discipline. If someone new to writing initially struggles to fulfil a task, then it can be surprising how much easier it gets to fulfil tasks the more a writer writes.

Like anything in life which one has approached, but thought difficult, but ultimately achieved, the more one does it the easier it gets - generally!

The Need for Self Discipline

If a writer plans to write a few lengthy articles, then he or she will learn when to take breaks, and learn to be patient if and when writer's block creeps in. A writer will gradually become accustomed to both the demands and the need for self discipline in writing.

Self discipline is important for any skill. With writing, self discipline is needed to write in a structured way, it's needed to write in a way with the people reading your work in mind, and it's needed to actually write something to the required length in the first place.

Anyone new to writing will actually begin to welcome the discipline and structure writing requires, because it will aid the process of writing. For a 400-word article you can see your target, and build your article with the word limit in mind. Any guidelines requires discipline, but guidelines actually help with the writing of an article. If a writer is asked for an article about a subject and is given no guidelines, then they're really going to have to think more about the length and the style, and then hoping they've not made it too long or too short - and they may actually become more preoccupied with that than the actual subject matter. So writers often welcome a bit of self discipline being imposed upon them! The quicker a writer understands self discipline, the quicker a writer will normally be able to write.

Self Discipline Helps a Writer's Skills

Writers are creative, and for those writers who write articles, they should put their personal stamp on their work, and write in a fairly free way, but everything requires discipline. Being a rock guitarist may seem glamorous, but one doesn't see the countless hours of learning chords of songs. The hard graft becomes worth it, once it becomes apparent how much easier it is to make full use of the lessons learnt in a creative way.

The self discipline which is necessary for a writer will improve one's writing, and once self discipline is mastered, then a writer will be able to concentrate on the more creative aspect of writing.



Write About What You Know


Benefits Of Writing About What You Know

If you want to be able to write an article quickly, then this can be achieved if you write about something you know. Better still if it's something you love, as your enthusiasm can often really engage the reader.

More Options for Future Articles

The more you know about something the more options you have, too. If you are knowledgeable about British rock music from the 1960s to 1990s, then you can write about specific decades, specific artists, etc. If you only have some knowledge on the subject, then you will be more limited regarding how many articles you can write.

Saves Time

It can be fun to research a subject you're not that familiar with, but are interested in. However, when it comes to both researching and writing about the subject how much of your time will have been eaten into?

The Ability to Offer Sound Advice and Knowledge

Whenever you have good knowledge about a subject your writing should also flow more easily - as you're not having to think about whether, say, a technical description sounds right. Knowledge or advice given freely, by someone who writes with authority on a subject, will also be appreciated. 

How Writing Frees the Mind
 

Copyright © Paul Rance

Made of the Write Stuff - Paperback, Amazon.co.uk

Made of the Write Stuff by Paul Rance - Paperback Cover
Made of the Write Stuff - Paperback, Amazon.com

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